Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Alice - SCULLY - WILCOX - CLARKE


In a previous post - Unclaimed Money - mention was made of an Alice SULLY who married a WILCOX and went to Australia and assumed the name CLARKE. An article appeared in 'The Sydney Morning Herald' on the 27th of March, 1912 with regards to the will of one Thomas WILCOX and a beneficiary of that will was Alice SULLY.

Later in the same paper the following notice appeared -

NOTE-The said Alice Sully (formerly Wilcox) was a daughter of George Wilcox who was a son of the testator Thomas Wilcox. The said George Wilcox formerly resided at Weston-super-Mare Somerset, and he died on the 27th June 1862. The said Alice Wilcox married Charles Wesley Sully, and resided at Weston-super-Mare aforesaid. She was employed as a Milliner's Assistant until shortly befort the year 1883, when she left Weston-super-Mare and it is alleged went to Australia, and adopted the name of Clarke. It is alleged that she was last heard of in Sydney, New South Wales, in January, 1884.

MEREDITH MILLS, and CLARK, 
8 New Square, London, W. C. 
Agents for
BAKER and CO.,
Weston-super-Mare, England.

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Murder Suicide


The Murder and Suicide at Smithfield.

(Abridged from the Cairns Advertiser.)

INFORMATION reached Cairns on Boxing Day, from Smithfield, that Mr. Robert Craig had been shot by Bill Smith, and that the latter had shot himself. The particulars, as detailed at a magisterial enquiry before W. Mowbray, Esq., P.M., appear hereunder:— A magisterial enquiry was held on Thursday the 27th instant, before W. M. Mowbray, Esq., P.M., touching the cause of death of Robert Craig and William Smith, of Smithfield, when the following evidence was produced :—

James H. Norris, a constable, stationed at Smithfield, stated:
I remember yesterday, the 26th December; I was in Smithfield all day; I know the deceased Robert Jackson Craig, a storekeeper, and William Smith, a publican, both of Smithfield; at about 8 o'clock in the afternoon I heard several revolver shots—I think five; I immediately went down the street towards Mr. Craig's store; I saw Mr. Craig running across the street—he was running pretty quickly; I saw him immediately afterwards lying in his own door, and Mr. W. Cochrane and several others near him; immediately afterwards I went over to Smith's public-house on the opposite side of the street from Craig's store ; I saw William Smith lying on his back under the verandah; there was blood on his shirt; he stretched out his hand and said, "Will anyone hold me up ?" another man and myself took him by the hands and raised him up to a sitting posture; a few minutes after he seemed to get very weak ; he said, "Oh, I am done !" he died in about fifteen minutes, in the place where he was lying, under the verandah ; I examined his body ; I found the marks of a bullet about two inches under his right breast; there was only a small quantity of blood on his shirt; there were marks of powder on it too; a short time afterwards a packer named James Ferrier gave me a revolver and said "That was the one Smith shot Mr. Craig and himself with"; he said Smith threw it out of his hand when he shot himself, and he (Ferrier) found it lying on the ground beside Smith; I found five barrels had been recently discharged ; I also examined the inside of the dining room at Smith's public-house; I found a bullet, which appears to be one which fits the revolver produced; it was lying on the floor; I could   find no marks of where it had been discharged ; I noticed no bullet marks of where it had been discharged ; I noticed no bullet marks inside the place; there was only one wound on Smith's body; I did not examine Mr. Craig's body; I took charge of Smith until he died ; when I saw Smith was dead, I went over and saw Mr. Craig was dead ; Smith was about 45 or 50 years of age; he has a wife here; he told me about ten days ago he was often going to commit suicide while travelling through the bush; he was sober when he said this: Smith appeared to be under the influence of drink when I saw him immediately after he shot himself; I know of no motive he had for shooting Mr. Craig; I have heard he was in Mr. Craig's debt; he was in the habit of drinking a good deal; he did not get drunk, but got a good deal excited whilst under the influence of drink.

James Ferrier, sworn, said:
I am a packer; I was in Smithfield yesterday afternoon between 2 and 8 o'clock; I was standing at Solomon's store, opposite Smith's public-house ; I heard a noise inside Smith's house ; I heard talking and two shots fired ; the first thing I saw was Craig running out of the front door of Smith's public-house ; he was holding his hand on his breast, shouting out, "Murder!" and that he was done for; Smith ran out close behind him, and fired two shots at him from a revolver; he then held his hand up quickly towards his breast and shot himself; I heard the report and I saw him fall, and drop or throw the revolver down ; he then fell over, and I picked the revolver up and handed it to Constable Norris; the revolver produced is the one; I am sure Craig was wounded when I saw him first; he was holding his hand to his breast and calling out; the whole thing only took a few seconds from the time I heard the first two shots until I saw Smith shoot himself; I ran over as soon as I heard the two shots; Smith fell before I got across the street: he said to me, " Give me a drink of water, old fellow"; someone gave him water; he could not drink it; I afterwards saw both bodies dead ; I knew they were the bodies of Robert Craig and William Smith ; I saw Craig going into Smith's door about a minute before I heard the shots; I saw no one else but Smith and Craig near the public-house.

William Cochrane, sworn, deposed :
I knew the deceased Robert Jackson Craig and William Smith; Mr. Craig was my brother-in-law; I remember yesterday afternoon, about 25 minutes before 8 o'clock ; I heard two shots fired; I was then behind the grocery counter in Mr. Craig's store; I heard Mr. Craig's voice call out " Murder " twice; I ran from behind the counter into the street ; I saw Mr. Craig running across the street from Mr. Smith's public-house towards his store; he was holding his hand to bis breast; I saw Smith holding a revolver in his hand, and standing under his own verandah; I went past Mr. Craig towards Smith ; before I reached him I saw him throw the muzzle of the revolver quickly towards himself ; I heard a shot go off, and Smith fell immediately ; I did not stay to look at him, but turned back towards Mr. Craig; he was then under his own verandah ; he was staggering; I caught hold of him and laid him just inside the doorway of his store ; he died in a few seconds ; he said, "I am done, Bill; I have it in me ;" this was as I was laying him down ; I am not aware of any disagreement between them; Smith came into the store immediately before the occurrence and asked Mr. Craig to go over and he would settle with him ; he owed an account to Mr. Craig, and I understood Smith to mean he was going to pay him ; Mr. Craig then went over to Smith's public-house; they both went out together ; I heard the shots a few seconds afterwards ; Mr. Craig was 84 years of age, a native of Glasgow, Scotland ; his family and friends live in Brisbane ; Mr. Craig and Smith always appeared to be very good friends ; I know of no motive ; Smith was not sober before he came into the store; I did not notice what state he was in when he went out with Mr. Craig ; I noticed he was under the influence of drink about three-quarters of an hour previously ; after Mr. Craig's death I noticed a small wound about three inches below the left breast; it had the appearance of a revolver bullet's wound; it bled very little; it was the only wound I noticed; the two shots I heard were like shots from a revolver; I saw no one but Smith at the public-house.

The depositions were ordered to be forwarded to the Attorney-General. Mr. Robert Craig was (says the Advertiser) a young man in the prime of life, whose wife and children went south about three weeks back. He was one of our earliest merchants; a business man in every particular, and the one most largely engaged here in pursuits of every description. He was held in universal respect, and was justly considered one of the leading men—in fact, it may be said the most prominent one. Amongst the hundreds of packers travelling between this and the Hodgkinson goldfields the name of Craig is as a household word. The deceased had but recently added to his extensive operations the exportation of cedar produced here, and with reference to this a strange coincidence may be mentioned. On Wednesday the Lucy and Adelaide, schooner, arrived for the first cargo of cedar, and must have reached her point of destination, up the Barron River, some- where about the time the melancholy and fatal occurrence took place. Mr. Craig's awful and untimely end has shed a sad gloom throughout Cairns and Smithfield, as it will wherever it is known. The corpse was brought into Cairns on Thursday, and buried in the cemetery, the attendance at the funeral being very large, and without exception every house in town was closed. The funeral service was impressively read by Mr. James Powers. The awful catastrophe, so sudden, so unprovoked, and so very fatal, entirely unhinged everyone's nerves. Business was at a complete standstill, and the sorrowful countenances met at every stop manifested the universal grief for the late Mr. Craig and sincere sympathy for his family. The unhappy murderer's fate can but likewise cause a sorrowful feeling. Smith was a man known by and to all of us. We all are cognisant of recent troubles and misfortunes which overtook him, and, although we cannot conceal from ourselves that those troubles have been sensibly brought about by bis own passions and irregular conduct, still a thought of christian and human regret must flash through our brain, knowing this man took his own life at the moment he took that of another, and was hailed into the presence of his Maker without time to implore divine forgiveness for the cruel and cowardly murder he had committed.

Article appeared in The Queenslander on the 12th of January, 1878.

 

Old Smithfield


SOMETHING ABOUT SMITHFIELD.

Tragedies Which Occurred There.

The Shooting of Craig, "Coyyan" contributes the following article on Smithfield:-

Smithfield was situated on the north side of the Barron River, and was opened previous to Cairns as the port for the Hodgkinson goldfield. It is named after Bill Smith, who also opened the track to the Cairns inlet and Smith's CreeK landing, where the first goods and passengers were landed. Smithfield township only lasted eight months, but during that time it left some history to record. Smith fatally shot Craig, the merchant, who at the third shot fell in the doorway of his store. Smith committed suicide with the same revolver, but lived for about two hours. Craig died instantly.

A young man named Cunningham shot Frank, the packer, and also robbed him. He was caught at Bowen, on his way south, and was at the time wearing Frank's ring. He suffered the supreme penalty in the old Petrie Terrace Gaol.   

A policeman was seriously injured when using an adze, erecting the police camp in Smithfield. A young policeman on escort duty and Inspector Joley were shot at Stratford, and were carried to the camp by a packer named Guilfoyle. The policemen were buried on the river bank at Stratford. Guilfoyle met a tragic end at Black Gully, on the  Herberton road, and a man named Rody Hogan received a life sentence for the deed. It was the result of a drunken brawl.

The first cattle brought to Smithfield and Cairns were taken there by a Mr. Bird, father of the present  Baird Bros., of Merriwinni. Magnus Peterson was the first purchaser, and paid £10 per had for eight cows.

Smithfield Range Track

The Government expended £12,000 on the Smithfield range track. All work at that time was done by Government parties, and wages were 7/6 per day, and rations. Chas. McDonald, afterwards owner of Warthedge Station, was works inspector for the North. Carriers (bullock teams) who used this road were George the Greek, Reynolds, Cuddily, Mahony, Mullavey, and others. About 100 pack teams were also operating to the various fields at that time.

During the 1881 flood the waters reached the foot of the range, all Smithfield being submerged, and the few residents had a very anxious time. Mrs. Kopp was three nights and four days in a flattie, and subsisted on a  young pig that she caught when  swimming past the boat. Smithfield at one time was practically deserted, only two families remaining there. Double Island was selected by a Mr. Jamieson, and was known as the Buchan Estate. Yorkie's Knob is named after a beche-de-mur fisherman who died on Green Island, of which he was caretaker. 

Article appeared in the Cairns Post on the 1st of November, 1926
 

Headstones Maryborough Cemetery


These are the surnames for whom I have photographs of headstones in the Maryborough Cemetery. If you are interested in any that I may have 
please write
to me and I will see what I can do for you.
   
ALLCOCK ABBS ADAIR
ADAMS ADDERTON ADKINS
ALEXANDER ALLAN ALLEN
AMBROSE AMOS ANDERSEN
ANDERSON ANDREWS APPLETON
ARMSTRONG ASHFIELD ASHFORD
ASMUS ASTON AUSTIN
AWDRY BAILEY BAINES
BAKER BARBELER BARLOW
BARNETT BARNS BARRETT
BASSETT BASTIMAN BATES
BATTERSBY BAUER BAUMGART
BAYLDON BEATSON BEBBINGTON
BEGICK BEIERS BENGTSON
BENNETT BENSON BERRIE
BIDDLES BIGNELL BIRCH
BIRD BIRT BISHOP
BLACKWELL BLANCHARD BLATCHFORD
BLOOD BLUE BOLDERY
BOLWELL BOTTCHER BOURKE
BOWDEN BOWYER BOYD
BRADDOCK BRADFIELD BRADY
BREAKEL BRECHT BREEN
BREMNER BRETT BRIGHT
BROOKS BROOM BROPHY
BROWN BUCKLER BUETTEL
BUFFEY BULLS BUNN
BUNTING BURCHARD BURGESS
BURKE BUSHNELL BUSS
BUTLER BYRNE CAIN
CAIRNS CALDECOT CALDWELL
CAMERON CAMPBELL CANE
CANNY CARROLL CARSTENS
CARSWELL CARTER CARVOSSO
CATER CHAMBERLAIN CHANDLER
CHAPLIN CHAPPELL CHARTERIS
CHATTIN CHEEKE CHEESEMAN
CHEESMAN CHEW CHILD
CHRISTENSEN CHRISTOE CLARK
CLARKE CLARKSON CLEAVE
CLYNE COASE COGDALE
COILL COLLISHAW COMPTON
CONNELL CONNOR CONSIDINE
COOK COOTEN COPLEY
COPY CORSER COUTTS
COX COZENS CRANE
CRAWFORD CREE CROSS
CRUMP CRUSE CUNNINGHAM
CURTIS CUTTLER CUVET
DANIELS DAU
DAVIS DAWSON DAY
DEACON DEAN DEARNALEY
DEERE DEIGHTON DELANEY
DENNINGS DENT DIAMOND
DICKFOS DINGLE DITTMAN
DITTMANN DIXON DORAN
DORMER DOWZER DREISS
DRINKWATER DUCKWORTH DUNN
DUPLICATE DUTTON DYMOCK
EADIE EALES EDGAR
EDWARDS EILBECK ELFORD
ELLWOOD ELY ENSLEY
ETHEL FAGG FARROW
FENTON FERGUSON FINN
FINSELBACH FITZGERALD FLETCHER
FLETT FLYNN FOOTE
FOREMAN FORSTER FORSYTH
FOWLER FRANKLIN FRANKLING
FRANTZ FREHMANN FRENCH
FRESHNEY FROST FULTON
FUNK GALVIN GAMBIE
GARRETT GARTON GARVIE
GEE GEITZ GEORGE
GERITZ GERLER GIBSON
GIFFORD GILBERTSON GILHAM
GILLAM GILMOUR GODDARD
GOLDSMITH GOODGER GOODWIN
GORDON GRAHAM GRANT
GRAY GRAYSON GREGORY
GRIFFIN GRIGGS GRIMMETT
GROSS GRUBB GRUHL
GRUTCHFIELD GYPPO HABLER
HADDOW HADLINGTON HAGGER
HALCRO HALIFAX HALLETT
HALLIDAY HAMILTON HAMMANT
HAMMOND HANCOCK HANSEN
HANSON HARDIE HAROLD
HARRIS HARVEY HARWOOD
HATTON HAYDON HAZELL
HAZLETTE HEALY HEATH
HEMERDINE HENDERSON HENDLE
HENDRICKSEN HENRY HERBERLING
HEYER HIGGINS HILCOAT
HILL HILLCOAT HILLIS
HINSCH HIRST HOCKLEY
HODGSON HOGAN HOOK
HOOLE HOPE HOPPER
HORNE HORSBURGH HOUGHTON
HOWARD HOWES HOWLETT
HUBBARD HUGHES HULL
HUME HUMPHREYS HUMPHRIES
HUNTER HURFORD HUTCHINS
HYSLOP ILLIDGE ILSE
IMHOFF IRVING IRWIN
ISABEL JACKMAN JAMES
JAMIESON JARVIS JENSEN
JESSE JOHNSTON JONES
JUDAS JULIN JUNO
KEANE KEELER KEEN
KEENAN KELLY KENNELLY
KENT KERR KERRIDGE
KETTLEWELL KINAHAN KINDT
KING KIRK KLEIN
KNOWLES KRUGER KYHL
LACEY LACKEY LACY
LAING LAMB LANG
LANGLANDS LANGUSCH LARSEN
LASSIG LAWSON LEBECK
LEE LEFTWICH LEIGHTON
LENNIE LEVIN LEVISTON
LEWIN LEWIS LITTLE
LOBB LOUDEN LOVE
LOWE LUCAS LUCK
LYONS MACKENZIE MADSEN
MAIDMENT MAITLAND MALONE
MALONEY MANN MANSON
MARDEN MARDON MARKS
MARSDEN MARSHALL MASON
MASSEY MAUND MCALLISTER
MCARTHUR MCCARTHY MCCREADIE
MCDONALD MCDOUGALL MCDOUGHALL
MCDOWALL MCDOWELL MCELLIGOTT
MCEWAN MCEWEN MCGAVAN
MCGOWN MCGUIRE MCKAY
MCKENZIE MCKERGOW MCKIVER
MCLACHLAN MCLAUGHLAN MCLAY
MCLEAN MCLELLAN MCLENNAN
MCMAHON MCMANARA MCMEEKIN
MCNAB MCNALLY MCVINISH
MCWATTERS MEALAND MEDLEY
MELKSHAM MELLOR MENZIES
MERCARD MEREDITH MERGARD
MESNER MESSNER MEYER
MILLAR MILLER MILLS
MITCHELL MOLONY MOORE
MORAN MORDEN MORRISON
MORTENSEN MORTON MOSMAN
MOSS MOTEN MULHOLLAND
MULLANCEY MULREENY
MUNRO MURPHY MURRAY
NEAL NEGUS NEILSON
NETTERFIELD NEW NEWNHAM
NIBLOE NICHOLAS NOAKES
NOLAN NOLLEN NORRIS
NOWITZKE NUNN OAKLEY
OBRIEN OCONNOR OGDEN
OGILVIE OKANE OLDFIELD
OLSEN OLSON ONEIL
ORAM ORIELLY ORIGINAL
OSBORN OSULLIVAN OTOOLE
O`SULLIVAN O`TOOLE PAIN
PARMENTER PARNHAM PARRY
PARSONS PATEY PAUL
PAVELIN PAYNE PEACOCK
PEARCE PEARL PEARSON
PEATEY PERISON PETERSEN
PETHEBRIDGE PETZKE PINCH
PINCHBECK PITT PIZZEY
POLLARD PONTING POTMAN
POTTER POULTER POWELL
POWERS PREW PRICE
PROCTOR PURCELL PURSER
RAMPTON RAMSAY RANDALL
RANKIN READDY REARDON
REID REISENER RENDALL
REYNOLDS RICHARDSON RIDGWAY
RIECK ROBBINS ROBERTSON
ROBINSON RODGERS ROOK
ROOME ROSEBY ROSS
ROWE ROWLAND RUDOLPH
RUFF RUSSELL RYAN
RYRIE SAINSBURY SALMON
SANDERSON SATCHWILL SAUNDERS
SAWYER SCHAFFERIUS SCHEUERMANN
SCHIBROWSKI SCHMUCK SCHULZ
SCOTT SENIOR SEYMOUR
SHAW SHEASBY SHEPERD
SHERIDAN SIMPSON SIMS
SKIRROW SLADE SMITH
SMYTHE SORENSEN SOUTHERDEN
SOWERBY SPAROZVICH SPEAR
SPENCER SPIDEN STACEY
STALLEY STELEY STENDRUP
STEPHENS STEVENS STEVENSON
STEWART STILLWELL STONE
STORER STOREY SUTCLIFFE
SUTTON SWANBOROUGH TAIT
TAPPENDEN TAYLOR TELFER
TEMPLEMAN THACKER THAKE
THEFS THOMAS THOMPSON
THOMSON THORPE THURECHT
TIBOR TIDCOMBE TODD
TOMSON TOOTH TOWN
TOWNSEND TRAVIS TREDWEN
TRIGGER TROTMAN TURNER
VALENTINE
VARY VITTER WAKEFIELD
WALDRON WALKER WALLACE
WALSH WALTON WARBURTON
WARNOCK WARRELL WARREN
WARRY WATSON WEBB
WEBER WECENER WEEDON
WEGENER WELLINGTON WELLS
WELSH WENDT WENK
WERDER WHAYMAN WHEELER
WHETTER WHITE WHITING
WHITTAKER WIECKHORST WIGHTMAN
WIGMORE WILES WILLIAMS
WILLIAMSON WILLIS WILSON
WINTERHELD WITT WIX
WOODHOUSE WOODWARD WRIGHT
WROE WYETH WYLIE
YOUNG ZIMMER ZWISTLER