Thursday, October 06, 2016

A little known cemetery in Herberton

The Rose Lane Cemetery in Herberton is one of those cemeteries that has almost been lost to most of the current generation, including some of the Herberton locals.

Most of the information for this cemetery has been lost and only one headstone survives. Some research was done in the past in an effort to locate other grave sites within the cemetery, and while some locations have been identified, it is still unknown who is buried in those sites.

A notice board in the cemetery lists the names of the people who are supposed to be buried in the cemetery.

This link is a first attempt to publish the known information about the people who are supposed to be buried in the Rose Lane Cemetery. It will be updated as other information is gathered.

Monday, July 25, 2016

A good day at Paddy's Lagoon

It is truly amazing what you can find if you happen to ask the right person at the right time.

Traveling from Cloncurry to Normanton recently I called in at Donor's Hill station and spoke to the manager there about any possible graves on the property. The manager, Dan, informed me that he knew of only one grave at the junction of the Flinders and Gregory rivers, that it had no identifying marks and that it was hard to find. So, I continued on to Normanton.

In Normanton I began asking around if anyone knew of any McDOUGALLs or BAXTERs. I wanted to find George Frederick BAXTER and his wife, Mary Ann BAXTER (nee JOHNSTON), both of whose death certificates stated that they were buried at Paddy's Lagoon, which is part of the Donor's Hill station. George died 30th of July, 1898 and Mary died almost six years later on 20th July, 1904.

I was told to go to the BP service station in town and ask for a Jack O'NEIL who was one of the oldest people in town. When I arrived there were three men sitting in the driveway chatting, one was Jack, another was Ron STURMFELS and Pat GALLAGHER was also there, along with Wayne REEVES, the owner of the station who was balancing a tyre. I sat and began chatting and when I mentioned that I was looking for any information about any McDOUGALLs or BAXTERs, Wayne replied that he had a photograph of a BAXTER grave. "Let me finish balancing this tyre and I'll go and get it for you."

When he returned, he showed me two photographs of the same grave.

To my surprise it was my maternal great grand father, George Frederick BAXTER. It turns out that Wayne once worked on Donor's Hill station mustering a couple of decades ago and when he saw the grave he photographed it. I asked if he would be able to tell me how to find it, to which he gave me directions but added that it would be hard to find because of all of the growth over the past couple of decades.

I set off from Normanton at 6am to search for George in the cool of the day. Paddy's Lagoon is one hours drive south on the Burke Development Road where I find a gate that opens to a one time graded track along a boundary fence. I travel about three kilometers along the fence to the lagoon, which is about one kilometer long and up to eighty meters wide. It has a good supply of water in it, only because of recent rain and there is a small verity of bird life, including a couple of pelicans and half a dozen brolgas. First off I traverse the whole of the eastern side but don't find anything and then turn my attention the the western side.

About half way down the lagoon I come across a number of old stumps, too many together, and too many in straight lines to be natural vegetation. I remember Wayne telling me that these gidgee (Acacia cambagei) stumps were all that remained of the hotel that once stood there next to the lagoon. If I can find where the hotel once stood then Charles can't be far away.

I continue further towards the southern end of the lagoon and half a kilometer later I find what I'm looking for, George's grave.

What a lonely spot. The death certificate for his wife Mary Ann BAXTER (nee JOHNSTON) says that she is also buried here, I do hope she is with George to keep him company.

I find myself standing here on the 24th of July, 2016, six days short of 118 years after George had died wondering what sort of a life he must have had in such a place. I wonder if George and Mary were living in and or running the hotel further up the track.

Paddy's Lagoon is a quiet restful place with a good supply of water. There were two pelicans and about a dozen brolgas along with some ducks and other birds. There were only two cattle in the area.

Finding George's grave has made the trip to Normanton worthwhile.

Friday, June 24, 2016

Drowning at Landsborough.


A sad case of drowning occurred two miles from Landsborough about 7 p.m. on March 25. Mr. H. Wrigley, in company with Mr. Harrison, was returning home from Landsborough, and when they arrived nearly at their destination, a creek only dividing them from the former's dwelling, Mrs. Wrigley was waiting on the opposite side of the creek, and she tried to persuade her husband to remain where he was until the water subsided. To this advice he paid no attention, and divesting himself of part of his clothing he went into the creek and attempted to cross, hut unfortunately was drowned in presence of his wife. The body was recovered the following morning early, close to the bank, in very shallow water. No attempt appears to have been made to save him, Harrison stating that he could not swim. The unfortunate man was buried in tho afternoon. He was well known in the district, and an expert swimmer. He leaves a widow and seven orphans, ranging from 11 years to three months, to mourn their loss. They are left almost destitute. A meeting was held on March 26, at 8 o'clock, at Mr. Jolly's hotel, to consider the above case, and collections were made, amounting to £11 8s. 6d. A subscription list has been started, which will be kept open till April 9 to enable all those who were not at the meeting to subscribe.

Drowning at Landsborough. (1890, April 1). The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), , p. 2. TROVE

Monday, April 04, 2016

Grammar School Scholarships.

THE annual examinations of candidates for grammar school scholarships in this colony took place on the 15th and 16th December last, when 103 boys and 30 girls presented themselves. The candidates eligible for these examinations are State school children who have not attained the age of 14 years. The examinations were held at the various local centres, under the supervision of responsible officers of the department or other specially selected persons. The regulations provide that the scholarships shall not exceed 120 in number; of these ninety are available for boys, and thirty for girls. The scholarships are tenable during good behaviour and the pleasure of Parliament for a period of three years. The successful candidates may elect to attend any grammar school in the colony recognised as such by the Legislature.
The following is a list of the successful candidates for the scholarships, in the order of merit :—
1. James Llewellyn Jones, Brisbane Central.
2. Leonard Brown, Brisbane Central.
3. Thomas P. Power, Brisbane Central.
4. George Ernest Dennis, Petrie-terrace.
5. Edwin James Came, South Brisbane.
6. Leland E. Challands, East Maryborough.
7. Edward C. M'Collim, Brisbane Central.
8. Edwin R. Aland, Toowoomba South.
9. Walter C. Popple, East Ipswich.
10. Osmund Agar, Brisbane Central.
11. John Alex. Mank, Toowoomba North.
12. Wyndham G. F. King, Brisbane Central.
13. Hamill Geo. Sargent, Zillman's Waterholes.
14. Hugh MD. Russell, Brisbane Central.
15. Stanley R. Kenyon, Toowoomba South.
16. Ernest M. Smith, Brisbane Central.
17. Jne. Wm. Crawford Hunter, Brisbane Central.
18. John James Doran, Brisbane Central.
19. Wm. Parkinson, East Ipswich.
20. Geo. B. Ride—ay, Albert, Maryborough.
21. Robert F. Way, Toowoomba South.
22. Joseph Shillinglaw, Gympie Central.
23. Robt H. Munro, Gehane.
24. Wm. Jno. Best, Fortitude Valley.
25. Alex. Worley, East Ipswich.
26. John Prooan, Toowoomba North.
27. Charles Drew, Ipswich Reserve.
28. Isaac Robinson, Leichhardt-street
29. John S. Birge, Warwick West
30. Alex. J. Elliott, Ipswich North.
31. George Clem, Pine Mountain.
32. Wm. Jos. Anthony, Brisbane Central.
33. Wm. M. Brown, East Ipswich.
34. Robert James Hardgrave, Woolloongabba.
35. James H K. Manwaring, Petrie-terrace.
36. Joseph August Krause, South Brisbane.
37. J. W. Berrett, Ipswich North.
38. George A. Ferguson, Fortitude Valley.
1. Mary F. Canny, Warwick West.
2. Caroline A. Naylor, Surat
3. Annie C. Campbell, Brisbane Central.
4. Minnie Rose, Drayton.
5. Violet H. Scott, Kangaroo Point
6. Amelia Clark, Drayton.
7. Florence J. Cole, Leichhardt-street.
8. Mary A. C. Ewing, Kelvin Grove-road.

Grammar School Scholarships. (1886, January 30). The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), , p. 187. TROVE

Monday, August 03, 2015

Mother with nine children

A TERRIBLE VOYAGE.---The steamer WilliamPenn, from London and Havre to
New York,with 500 passengers, has arrived after a terriblepassage. On
Tuesday, the 10th of November,when the steamer was in the mid-Atlantic,
aheavy storm came on and continued with greatviolence for five days. The
432 steerage passengers were of necessity confined to their berths.The
strength of the gale would lift large massesof foam from tho crests of
the great waves andspread them over the entire length and breadthof the
ship, drenching everything and every-body. The ship behaved admirably,
with theexception of her dreadful rolling. At about 6a.m. on the 12th,
and before the passengers hadleft their berths, those of the first cabin
werearoused from their vigils by a tremendous crashon the starboard side
of the ship and the dashof waters down upon them. All, of course,
wasconsternation and dismay until the extent ofthe injury or danger
could be distinctly ascertained. They had shipped a heavy sea thatstove
in about ten feet of the dining saloonabove, and the water, flooding the
floor, wasmaking its way through the openings for ventilation and light
to the cabins below, whichwere flooded to the great discomfort of the
in-mates. The incident created the greatest alarmamongst the passengers,
which was increasedalmost to a frenzy when a second tremendoussea broke
into the fore saloon, and flooded thecabin so much that it was found
necessary totake the women and children to the after-saloon.One mother
of nine was in a state of franticalarm. Having left the aft-saloon with
heryoungest child she took her station at the opendoor, and there stood
counting her children ---one, two, three, as one by one they arrived
untilseven of the nine had been counted in,

but seeing nothing of the other two, cried out, as if in bitter agony,
"But where, oh where are the twins ?" Ina moment more the twins also
were safe.

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Shark Attack

DRURY.-On the 27th November at The Retreat, Petrie's Bight, Brisbane, Alexey O'Connell, youngest son of Albert Victor and Mary Drury, aged 12 years and 5 months, from mutilations received from a shark whilst bathing.

Family Notices. (1880, November 29). The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), p. 2. TROVE

Friday, January 16, 2015

Death from Convulsions.

A lad of 12 years, named Robert Charles Brennan, residing at South-street, Ipswich, had an attack of convulsions on Monday about 4 o'clock, and died shortly afterwards. Dr. Brown was summoned, but the lad was beyond his aid. A postmortem examination was held yesterday.

Family Notices. (1912, April 24). The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), p. 4. TROVE